Innovative Economy-Higher Education (Destiny Driver #5)

November 19, 2009

Over the next ten years we will maintain the highest percentage of high school students in Minnesota going on to higher education (university, college, or technical college).

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3 Responses to “Innovative Economy-Higher Education (Destiny Driver #5)”

  1. […] ten years we will maintain the highest percentage of high school students in Minnesota going on to higher education (university, college, or technical […]

  2. Morris Area top area school according to magazine ranking
    For the fourth straight year, Morris Area High School is included in a U.S. News and World Report ranking of the top U.S. schools
    Published February 09 2011 morrissuntribune.com

    Morris Area High School is once again the lone school in the area name to a U.S. News & World Report ranking of the top schools in the U.S.

    MAHS placed in the bronze category, a recognition that it has earned each year since 2008.

    Thirty-nine high schools were recognized in Minnesota, but no other schools in Stevens, Traverse, Grant or Pope counties were included on the list.

    “We are fortunate to be recognized by US News and World Report,” said Morris Area Superintendent Scott Monson. “This shows the hard work our staff continues to do. While we realize there is more work to be done, we will continue to strive to provide a quality education for all of our students.”

    U.S. News, in collaboration with School Evaluation Services, analyzed academic and enrollment data from over 21,000 public high schools to find the best across the country. These top schools were placed into gold, silver, bronze, or honorable mention categories.

    According to the U.S. News and World Report, the methodology used is based on the key principles that a great high school must serve all its students well, not just those who are college bound, and that it must be able to produce measurable academic outcomes to show the school is successfully educating its student body across a range of performance indicators.

    A three-step process determined the best high schools. The first two steps ensured that the schools serve all their students well, using state proficiency standards as the benchmarks. For those schools that made it past the first two steps, a third step assessed the degree to which schools prepare students for college-level work, the magazine reported.

  3. Morris Area High School: Nationally Recognized As One of America’s Best High Schools

    Created: 02/10/2011 5:45 PM KSAX.com
    http://ksax.com/article/stories/S1968472.shtml?cat=10230

    MORRIS, Minn. (KSAX) – The Morris Area High School was named one of America’s Best High Schools by a U.S. News & World Report ranking for the fourth year in a row, and students, faculty and staff feel both honored and deserving.

    Morris Area Schools Superintendent Scott Monson said the ranking is based on student performance and college readiness. MAHS received the bronze-level standing, and Monson said the school most likely didn’t get gold or silver because the school doesn’t have Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses.

    “There are very few schools in our area (that are ranked),” Monson said. “In what we consider West Central Minnesota, we are the only high school that was considered, at least this past year.”

    Teachers and students at the high school were excited about the national recognition. Business Teacher Jennifer Maras said she is not shocked MAHS was honored with this title.

    “I am not surprised,” Maras said. “Without hesitation, this community is in support of education. This community is in it for the kids.”

    Several other high schools in Greater Minnesota were also recognized including the following: Cass Lake-Bena, Lakeview, Minneota, New York Mills, Osakis, Sebeka, Battle Lake, Bemidji, Tracy and Underwood.

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